REVIEWS

Opera Composers in Song

 

Matching this attitude toe-to-toe, soprano Elizabeth Tredent had several opportunities to play this war of the sexes beginning with Verdi’s sassy “Stornello,” which opens with “You say you don’t love me ... I don’t love you either.” Tredent, who wowed us this season in her comic roles of Rita (“Rita”) and “Susanna’s Secret” (Il segreto di Susanna), molded her robust, beautiful voice to the saucy demands of Bizet’s “Ouvre ton Coeur” (Open your heart) and the flirty “Les Fillis de Cadix” (The daughters of Cadix) by Delibes.

 

Tredent sank into the profundity of Rachmaninoff’s “The Answer” (text by Victor Hugo). “Spring Waters” unleashed the energy of spring and of Tredent’s glorious full voice while the piano gushed with lush harmonies and fingerwork clearly of Rachmaninoff’s hand.

Gayle Williams

Herald Tribune

Tredent was at her dramatic and vocal best in Delibes’ “Les Filles de Cadix,” and “The Answer” and “Spring Waters,” by Rachmaninoff. 

Edward Alley

Your Observer

Double Bill: Rita & Il segreto di Susanna

Elizabeth Tredent was Rita. She immediately succeeded with her opening aria, which lasts more than eight minutes. Stunningly attractive, she could be saccharine one moment, and a force the next.

Phillip Gainsley

Opera News

The characters, inspired by commedia dell’arte, are bold and exaggerated. Tredent slides easily between sweet wife and shrew, but always with a light and lovely voice, accommodating the beauty of her lines and the coloratura ornamentation.

 

Tredent on the other hand is given a beguiling aria, beautifully sung, extolling the irresistible allure of the blue smoke rising from her cigarette.

Gayle Williams

Herald Tribune

Elizabeth Tredent is fast becoming a company favorite, and this production shows why. She is a lyric soprano, ideal for Susanna in the second half, but she acquits herself delightfully in the more florid Donizetti. As Rita, she is vivacious, as Susanna a touch vixenish.

William S. Oser

Talkin Broadway

Elizabeth Tredent showed a clear, clean soprano along with the spunk necessary to win the admiration of the audience, if not her two husbands. 

American Record Guide

Elizabeth Tredent was in excellent voice as Rita.....her sumptuous voice seemed made for the role of Susanna.

Edward Alley

Your Observer

La Traviata, Sarasota Opera, 2017

La traviata is a soprano's dream and Ms. Tredent is especially brilliant in her portrayal as Violetta. Her statuesque frame lends an air of royalty and sophistication to her courtesan role throughout the production.

Carolan Trbovich

Broadway World

Elizabeth Tredent, who was most impressive in last season’s “Love of Three Kings,” proved more than equal to the task. She has a lovely lyric voice that she uses well, and her performance was both vocally lovely and dramatically convincing throughout the evening.

Edward Alley

Your Observer

As Violetta Valery, Elizabeth Tredent used her large and splendid soprano voice to great dramatic effect as she expressed the depth of her love for Alfredo Germont…

Richard Storm

Herald Tribune

The Love of Three Kings, Sarasota Opera, 2017

Elizabeth Tredent is positively splendid in the all-important role of the beautiful Fiora, for whom all three royals fall and fall hard. Her voice is enough to  make audience members fall for her, as well. And her acting works beautifully with her spectacularly produced voice.

June LeBell

Your Observer

Among an accomplished cast, Elizabeth Tredent's Princess Fiora stood out for her piercing, powerful voice.

Karyl Charna Lynn

Opera Now

...statuesque soprano, Elizabeth Tredent, had a...sonically rich and dramatically effective voice. 

Alan Becker

American Record Guide

Elizabeth Tredent is triumphant as the Princess who captures everyone's heart. 

Carolan Trbovich

Broadway World

Elizabeth Tredent takes on the formidable vocal and dramatic challenge embedded in her portrayal of the complex and sometimes unlikeable Fiora with impressive vocal resources

Richard Storm

Herald Tribune

Le nozze di Figaro, dell'Arte Opera Ensemble, 2015

Only a few members of the large ensemble cast seemed ready for prime time. Most attractive was soprano Elizabeth Tredent as the Countess, her creamy soprano lending passion to the character’s elegant arias.

James Jorden

The New York Observer

Madama Butterfly, Lyric Opera of Kansas City, 2012

Elizabeth Tredent, an elegant and responsive actress, crafted a memorable Suzuki, Cio-Cio San’s ever-present maid and confidante. With graceful movements and gestures, Tredent navigated Suzuki’s various functions and emotions, appropriately giddy, then immediately distraught, fiercely protective, then soon enough humbled and put in her place. Via a capable and richly colored mezzo, Tredent shone in “Io so che alle sue pene” alongside Vania and Weston Hurt. Together, Tredent and Caballero were a dramatic force, particularly in Acts 2 and 3 as the depths of their relationship are more musically and dramatically realized…She [Caballero] and Elizabeth Tredent (Suzuki) were also impeccably balanced in the “Flower Duet,” both reveling in the leisurely dissonance that presages what is to befall Butterfly. Cio-Cio San’s gradual descent in Act 3—toward a reticent acceptance of reality—is gloriously painful to watch alongside Suzuki’s ever-watchful shadow…

Sarah Tyrrell

KC Metropolis

Fine voices in this production include soprano Elizabeth Tredent as Suzuki.

Robert Trussell

The Kansas City Star

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